Severe Weather

 Severe Weather Information

tornadoSevere Weather Season is Here! Preparation is Our Best Defense! Severe weather season can bring frightening storms, incredible damage and change lives in the blink of an eye. The best way to meet violent Texas weather is to be prepared. KnoWhat2Do has a number of steps you can take to help each member of the family know what to do when storms are coming.

Knowing your hazards is just one component of preparedness- the next step is to ACT! Make sure each member of the family knows how to use the following resources:

Emergency Notification System
http://wireless.capcog.org/ENS/Intro.aspx

NOAA All Hazards Weather Radio (NWR) Listen for emergency information.

Emergency Alert System (EAS) Tune into your radio for instructions.

Outdoor Warning System Pay attention to sirens. Sirens may be used for all-hazard notification. When sirens are sounded, go indoors and tune in to local news and radio programs to understand the nature of the emergency.

TV Broadcasts Watch for emergency interruptions and tune into news stations.

If you live in a trailer or other housing susceptible to tornadoes or high winds, consider your evacuation plan.

Creating an Evacuation Plan:

  • Plan places to meet within and outside of your immediate neighborhood.
  • Keep a half tank of gas in your car at all times in case you need to evacuate.
  • Familiarize yourself with alternate routes out of your area.
  • If you don’t have a car, plan other means of transportation.

A tornado is one of nature’s most powerful and destructive forces.

• Prepare for a tornado by gathering emergency supplies including food, water, medications, batteries, flashlights, important documents, road maps, and a full tank of gasoline.

• When a tornado approaches, anyone in its path should take shelter indoors—preferably in a basement or an interior first-floor room or hallway.

• Avoid windows and seek additional protection by getting underneath large, solid pieces of furniture.

• Avoid automobiles and mobile homes, which provide almost no protection from tornadoes.

• Those caught outside should lie flat in a depression or on other low ground and wait for the storm to pass.

Here is an interesting website to use for  the history of tornado sightings.

http://www.tornadohistoryproject.com/